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U.S. Congressman Bill Posey

Press Releases

Representatives Posey, Holt Introduce Bipartisan Resolution to Raise Awareness of Esophageal Cancer


Washington, May 11, 2010 - Today Congressman Bill Posey (R-FL) joined with Congressman Rush Holt (D-NJ) in introducing a bipartisan resolution (H.Res.1343) recognizing the importance of detecting esophageal cancer during its earliest stages, advancing medical research, and supporting the goals and ideals of Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month.
 
“The five-year survival rate for those diagnosed with esophageal cancer is less than 20% and many pass away within a year of being diagnosed,” said Posey. “Several weeks ago I received a call from a constituent who so courageously shared her experience with her husband's battle with esophageal cancer. This drew my attention to the fact that early detection is critical because effective treatments are seriously lacking. I am pleased to work with my colleague, Congressman Rush Holt, to help raise awareness about esophageal cancer.”
 
“As a research scientist and the spouse of a physician, I understand and appreciate the need for greater biomedical research funding to cure debilitating diseases like esophageal cancer. While we have succeeded in boosting funding for federal cancer research over the last few years, we still have much more to do. By making a commitment to research, we can find better treatments for dozens of crippling diseases and save thousands of lives,” Holt said.

The rates of esophageal cancer have been rising dramatically for the past several decades, increasing by more than 400%. The American Cancer Society estimates that this year alone more than 16,000 new cases of esophageal cancer will be diagnosed in the United States and nearly 14,500 deaths from esophageal cancer will occur. With such a significant increase in the number of cases of esophageal cancer and with a mortality rate of nearly 80%, often those diagnosed with esophageal cancer are diagnosed too late after the disease has progressed too far for current treatments to be effective.  Posey added that he hopes to draw attention to this issue in order to foster better interventions and treatments for esophageal cancer.

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